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Бакалаврская программа «Политология и мировая политика»

Qualitative Methods in Political Research

2021/2022
Учебный год
ENG
Обучение ведется на английском языке
5
Кредиты
Статус:
Курс обязательный
Когда читается:
2-й курс, 1, 2 модуль

Преподаватели


Лапина Вероника Олеговна

Course Syllabus

Abstract

This course familiarizes students with methodological issues raised by interpretation in political science scholarship and provides them with an introduction to the use of qualitative methods for analysis of political phenomena. The course encourages students to reflect on how they conceptualise, design and analyse the political world. This involves exploring the relationship between theory and empirical research with particular emphasis on the collection and analysis of qualitative data (namely, the techniques of participant observation, in-depth interview, digital ethnography). The course explores ethnographic methodologies and various interpretive approaches used in works from fields such as politics, public policy, International Relations, global governance studies and (critical) development studies. It also considers practical methodological strategies that will aid students to design their own research with a proper fit between research questions and methods.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • 1. To introduce students to methodological issues raised by interpretation in political science scholarship and to provide them with a toolbox for the use of qualitative methods for analysis of political phenomena
  • 2. To learn how to formulate and address research problems that can be solved by the qualitative methodology tools
  • 3. To learn how to to conduct fieldwork in effective and ethical way
  • 4. To familiarize students with the basics of computer-based qualitative text analysis
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • Able to do research, including the problem analysis, setting goals and objectives, defining the research subject, selecting research methods including its quality control
  • Able to think critically and interpret the experience (personal and of other persons), relate to professional and social activities
  • is able to design her own research with a proper fit between research questions and methods
  • is able to use the techniques of participant observation, in-depth interview, digital ethnography
  • is able to use qualitative methods for analysis of political phenomena
  • is familiar with methodological issues raised by interpretation in political science scholarship
  • knows how interpretive approaches have been used in politics, public policy, International Relations, global governance studies and (critical) development studies
  • reflects on how she conceptualises, designs and analyses the political world
  • Student is capable of retrieving, collecting, processing and analyzing information relevant for achieving goals in the professional field
  • Student is capable of choosing research methods appropriate for resolving the professional tasks
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Introduction to Qualitative Methodology
  • (Self)ethnography. Participant observation
  • Qualitative interview: data collection
  • Focus-groups
  • Visual methods
  • Digital ethnography
  • INTRODUCTORY CLASS AND NOTES ON THE IN-CLASS MODULE ASSIGNMENT
  • GROUNDED THEORY: INTERVIEW CODING, ANALYTIC MEMOS
  • DATA PRESENTATION
  • DISCOURSE ANALYSIS I: THE ARCHEOLOGY OF KNOWLEDGE
  • DISCOURSE ANALYSIS II: NEW MATERIALISM
  • INTERDISCIPLINARITY AND INTERSECTIONALITY IN QUALITATIVE RESEARCH
  • INTERSECTIONALITY II: FEMINIST AND POSTCOLONIAL THEORIES IN ACTION
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Class assignment: first module
    Every assignment includes take-home element (half of the grade) and in-class participation i.e. group presentation (another half of the grade for that particular assignment).
  • non-blocking Class assignment: first module
    Every assignment includes take-home element (half of the grade) and in-class participation i.e. group presentation (another half of the grade for that particular assignment).
  • non-blocking Class assignment: first module
    Every assignment includes take-home element (half of the grade) and in-class participation i.e. group presentation (another half of the grade for that particular assignment).
  • non-blocking Methodology paper and data collection (2nd module)
    By WEEK 4 each study group is to write and submit a summary description of the methodology used for their pilot study. It is to include the following topics: I. Introduction (summary of the research problem with reference to the literature) II. Research Purpose and Research questions III. Methodological design IV. Field setting and consent procedures V. Sampling and confidentiality Throughout the semester, groups are to be collecting observations, interviews, focus group interviews and documents and archival data. To facilitate methodological skill development, students are to complete their data collection procedures at recommended times throughout the semester and turn in copies of their “raw” data for review and feedback on their methodology. These data will be used as a basis for classroom and small group discussion. Students are to bring summary written notes to class to talk about the challenges in undertaking each data collection procedure, to be used in our discussions. 8-10 pages + bibliography, Times New Roman, 12pt font, doublespaced, 1 inch (2,54 cm) margins
  • non-blocking Pilot study abstract (2nd module)
    By the WEEK 2 groups are to submit a one-page abstract describing their pilot study topic. This abstract should include the following information: • description of the research problem ; • field setting you intend to use for the pilot study; • scope of work you intend to cover in conducting the pilot study; • qualitative methods you aim to employ with methodological justification.
  • non-blocking Pilot study findings (2nd module)
    The findings of the pilot study will be written as a final report and will be due on WEEK 6. This should be a reflection on the results as they apply to the conceptual issues of the study, summarizing what is learned and what questions remain. It extends the prior methodology paper. The findings should include conclusions and recommendations for a continued study on this topic (including possible revisions of the methodology for a major study). Final paper: 10-15 pages +bibliography Times New Roman, 12pt font, doublespaced 1 inch (2,54 cm) margins.
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (2 module)
    0.2 * Class assignment: first module + 0.15 * Class assignment: first module + 0.15 * Class assignment: first module + 0.2 * Methodology paper and data collection (2nd module) + 0.1 * Pilot study abstract (2nd module) + 0.2 * Pilot study findings (2nd module)
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Bliesemann de Guevara, B. (2016). Myth and Narrative in International Politics : Interpretive Approaches to the Study of IR. London: Palgrave Macmillan. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1243387
  • Francisco Panizza, & Romina Miorelli. (2013). Taking Discourse Seriously: Discursive Institutionalism and Post-structuralist Discourse Theory. Political Studies, 2, 301. https://doi.org/10.1111/post.2013.61.issue-2
  • Frost, N., Nolas, S., Brooks-Gordon, B., Esin, C., Holt, A., Mehdizadeh, L., & Shinebourne, P. (2010). Pluralism in Qualitative Research: the impact of different researchers and qualitative approaches on the analysis of qualitative data.
  • Interpretation and method: Empirical research methods and the interpretive turn, 2nd ed. (2014). M.E. Sharpe. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsnar&AN=edsnar.oai.library.wur.nl.wurpubs.449341
  • Klotz, A. (DE-588)136942571, (DE-627)588715077, (DE-576)301356912, aut. (2007). Strategies for research in constructivist international relations Audie Klotz and Cecelia Lynch.
  • Leavy, P. (2014). The Oxford Handbook of Qualitative Research. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=779511
  • Qualitative Research Methods. (2011). SAGE Publications Inc.
  • Silverman, D. (DE-588)141743867, (DE-627)631177094, (DE-576)163079072, aut. (2010). Doing qualitative research a practical handbook David Silverman.
  • Taylor, S. J., DeVault, M. L., & Bogdan, R. (2016). Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods : A Guidebook and Resource (Vol. 4th edition). Hoboken, New Jersey: Wiley. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1061324

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Brinkmann, S. (2013). Qualitative Interviewing. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=603936
  • Kelle. (1997). Theory Building in Qualitative Research and Computer Programs for the Management of Textual Data. Sociological Research Online, 2, 1.
  • LUNDBORG, T., & VAUGHAN-WILLIAMS, N. (2014). New Materialisms, discourse analysis, and International Relations: a radical intertextual approach. https://doi.org/10.1017/s0260210514000163
  • Thinking interpretively: Philosophical presuppositions and the human sciences. (2006). M.E. Sharpe.
  • Thorne, B. (1980). “You Still Takin” Notes?’ Fieldwork and Problems of Informed Consent. https://doi.org/10.2307/800247