• A
  • A
  • A
  • АБВ
  • АБВ
  • АБВ
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Обычная версия сайта

Бакалаврская программа «Политология и мировая политика»

03
Июнь

Sustainability and Development Policy

2021/2022
Учебный год
ENG
Обучение ведется на английском языке
4
Кредиты
Статус:
Курс по выбору
Когда читается:
4-й курс, 3 модуль

Преподаватель

Course Syllabus

Abstract

In 2015, the United Nations adopted 17 global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) following the publication of «Limits to Growth» (1972) and the Brundtland Report (1987). The aims declared were to reduce poverty and hunger, achieve gender equality, respond to urgent climate changes, support efforts to follow for responsible production and consumption. SDGs are quite ambitious and demand on persons who seek to develop insights into development issues acquire suitable interdisciplinary skills. During the course we will pay particular attention to the following topics: the history of development studies, the fundamentals of development perspective, the informal economy and development, markets, reciprocity and exchange: discussion of household dynamics, gender and planned development in the line with neo-liberal policy, the issue of poverty as a local strategy of resistance towards state policies. We will also discuss why the implementation of development projects did not go as planned in many «third world» countries. Postsocialism and Postcolonialism dichotomy will be the centre of our interest when discussing different case studies.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • • To enlighten students by providing the conceptual frameworks of Sustainable Development
  • • To look through the theories of sustainability and understand how they can be applied to the post-2015 development policy agenda
  • • To understand the different dimensions of sustainable development, including environmental, economic, and social ones based on examples from various regions of the world and cultural settings
  • • To explore the various critiques of sustainable development issues prominent across social science to understand the complexity of present-day development policy
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • The students will acquire the necessary methodological skills needed to measure the development that will allow them to assess socio-economic and political situations in the country under consideration
  • The students will be able to write the analytical documents of their choice in several areas of study
  • The students will learn about key theories of sustainability and different dimensions of sustainable development in development studies and various critiques of sustainable development issues
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Topic 1: Sustainability and Development: Introduction.
  • Topic 2: Social, economic, and environmental policy dimensions in Sustainable Development.
  • Topic 3: Instruments and strategies in Development Policy.
  • Topic 4: Practice of Sustainable Development Policy.
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Workshop attendance and activities
    Workshop attendance and activities. The students should read articles/books that the lecturer will ask them to read and answer the lecturer’s questions concerning the content of articles/books individually while attending the workshop (for each passed test, students will get max. 1). There also will be two case studies to be considered in groups (no more than four students per group). During group work, students will be asked to consider the case study. To carry out this task each student will be asked to do his/her part of group work individually but do it in such a manner that would ensure cohesion in work. There is also a need to make at least one presentation on the topic under study (max. grade is 4).
  • non-blocking Policy paper
    Policy paper presenting an analysis of one of the development projects in Sustainable Development Policy Areas worldwide. Students are strongly encouraged to use the following format to plan the paper: 1. Introduction 1. What is his/her paper about (argument/hypothesis)? A student must apply the theoretical tools studied during the course. 2. The general description of the specific policy area 2. The methodology used to analyze the materials collected to support the hypotheses of the work. 3. Findings 1. the presentation of evidence/data 2. what conclusions are drawn from the findings? Theory must be applied and explain the practice. Don’t show the gap between theory and practice. 3. do you make any recommendations? 4. Appendices 1. Tables, pictures 2. List of sources, references The final policy paper (approx. 2000 words) needs to be submitted a week after the final session.
  • non-blocking Final oral examination
    There will be a face-to-face conversation with students where the lecturer will ask questions concerning both the course content and his/her policy paper. At least two weeks before the exam starts, the students will receive the general list of exam questions. During the exam, students will be asked to answer from 3 up to 10 questions to assess the general knowledge acquired during the course. If a student can answer all questions, he/she will earn the highest grade. If a student does not answer at least one question, then he will earn no points. The lecturer can stop the exam if it is evident that the student cannot answer any question or do it with an easy step. Under the paragraph 43 of Regulations on current control examinations, final oral exam can be cancelled provided the sum of weights of assessment elements are equal to 1 (except for the exam). The lecturer announces the decision no later than last class occurs. 0.28 * Workshop attendance + 0,72 * Policy Paper (in the case of application of the paragraph 43 of Regulations on current control examinations)
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • 2021/2022 3rd module
    0.28 * Final oral examination + 0.44 * Policy paper + 0.28 * Workshop attendance and activities
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Dietz, S., & Neumayer, E. (2007). Weak and strong sustainability in the SEEA: concepts and measurement. LSE Research Online Documents on Economics.
  • Frank Ellis, & H. Ade Freeman. (2005). Rural Livelihoods and Poverty Reduction Policies. Routledge.
  • Handbook on development policy and management ed. by Colin Kirkpatrick . (2002).
  • John Blewitt. (2018). Understanding Sustainable Development: Vol. Third edition. Routledge.
  • Michael Redclift, & Delyse Springett. (2015). Routledge International Handbook of Sustainable Development. Routledge.
  • Oldekop, J. A., Fontana, L. B., Grugel, J., Roughton, N., Adu, A. E. A., Bird, G. K., Dorgan, A., Vera Espinoza, M. A., Wallin, S., Hammett, D., Agbarakwe, E., Agrawal, A., Asylbekova, N., Azkoul, C., Bardsley, C., Bebbington, A. J., Carvalho, S., Chopra, D., Christopoulos, S., & Crewe, E. (2016). 100 key research questions for the post-2015 development agenda. Development Policy Review, 34(1), 55–82. https://doi.org/10.1111/dpr.12147
  • Singh, K. (2009). Rural Development : Principles, Policies, and Management. SAGE Publications India Pvt., Ltd.

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Okechukwu Ukaga, Chris Maser, & Michael Reichenbach. (2010). Sustainable Development : Principles, Frameworks, and Case Studies. CRC Press.