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Natural Resources Governance: Policymaking, Economic Growth and Transnational Cooperation

2019/2020
Учебный год
ENG
Обучение ведется на английском языке
4
Кредиты
Статус:
Курс по выбору
Когда читается:
3-й курс, 3, 4 модуль

Course Syllabus

Abstract

The course is devoted to theoretical and empirical aspects of natural resource abundancy both on local, regional and international levels. Students will be provided with the knowledge of several theories of “resource curse” elaborated in economics and political science. We will discuss different aspects of “paradox of plenty” and several cases of abundance experience from all over the world – from Botswana, OAE and DRK to Norway, Australia and USA. Special attention will be payed to Soviet and post-soviet experience. Several classes will be devoted to international regimes and cooperation about energy, natural resources and climate change such as OPEC, Kimberley process, Kyoto protocol etc.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • The main objective is to provide students with the knowledge of several theories of “resource curse” elaborated in economics and political science.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • Able to solve professional problems based on synthesis and analysis
  • Able to outlines the need for resources and plan its using for solving professional problems
  • Student is capable of executing applied analysis of the political phenomena and political processes - by using political science methods - and in support of practical decision making process
  • Student is capable of reporting the results of the information retrieval and analysis, academic or applied research she/he has conducted: - in various genres (including reviews, policy papers, reports and publications pertaining to socio-political subject matter); - and depending on the target audience
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Types of natural resources and methods of their quantity and quality evaluation. The concept of resource in the economy. Indicators of resource abundance.
  • Resource curse: theories and models. Prebish – Singer hypothesis. Staple trap theory. Global market dependence and policy blindness.
  • Dutch disease.
  • Resource abundance and institutions. Rent. Politics and paradox of plenty.
  • "Blood Diamonds". Kimberley process. Botswana and DRC.
  • Experience of oil abundance. Norway, OAE, Venezuela.
  • Global market of oil, new technologies and trends. OPEC. Shale oil.
  • Regional and global markets of gaz. Pipelines and international cooperation. LNG and new perspectives.
  • Planned economy, natural resources and post-soviet transformations.
  • Global warming and sustainable growth. Nordhaus and Romer’s argument. Kyoto protocol.
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking In-class Participation
  • non-blocking In-class Presentation
    Students prepare two individual/ group presentations throughout the course. Common to group presentations is that they are group tasks: all members of the group get the same grade, and it is very important that students within the group work in common and coordinatedly. To achieve that result, keep in mind three things: - don’t postpone – start preparing the presentation as early as you can; - meet up: do not rely on digital coworking too much, meet to discuss and rehearse in person; - have a calendar specifying what you do and when, and stick to it; - use division of labour when it comes to preparing different substantive parts of the presentation. Avoid division of labour in formal tasks – it is less rewarding in terms of teamwork, and you learn less this way; - be explicit about who does what within your division of labour; - be responsible: do not be late for your presentations.
  • non-blocking The second presentation
    https://www.zoom.us/
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (4 module)
    0.3 * In-class Participation + 0.3 * In-class Presentation + 0.4 * The second presentation
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Gaidar, E. T. . (DE-588)119379228, (DE-627)284070912, (DE-576)212317938. (2007). Collapse of an empire lessons for modern Russia Yegor Gaidar. Transl. by Antonina W. Bouis. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edswao&AN=edswao.266592856

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Gylfason, T. (2001). Natural resources, education, and economic development. European Economic Review, (4–6), 847. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsrep&AN=edsrep.a.eee.eecrev.v45y2001i4.6p847.859
  • Kolstad, I., & Wiig, A. (2009). It’s the rents, stupid! The political economy of the resource curse. Energy Policy, (12), 5317. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsrep&AN=edsrep.a.eee.enepol.v37y2009i12p5317.5325
  • Paul Collier, & Anke Hoeffler. (2005). Resource Rents, Governance, and Conflict. Journal of Conflict Resolution, (4), 625. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsrep&AN=edsrep.a.sae.jocore.v49y2005i4p625.633
  • Rudiger Ahrend. (2006). How to Sustain Growth in a Resource Based Economy?: The Main Concepts and their Application to the Russian Case. OECD Economics Department Working Papers. https://doi.org/10.1787/622880627053