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Approaches and Methods in the Study of Narrative

2022/2023
Учебный год
ENG
Обучение ведется на английском языке
6
Кредиты
Статус:
Курс по выбору
Когда читается:
1-й курс, 3, 4 модуль

Преподаватель

Course Syllabus

Abstract

Approaches and Methods in the Study of Narrative is an elective advanced topic course in general and applied narratology. Storytelling permeates human experience. In lectures and tutorials, we discuss diverse forms of narration in fictional and factual discourses, learn analytic languages that address those discourses in terms of hardcore theory as well as creative and performative practices, and scrutinize stories set in a variety of media, verbal and non-.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • The principal objective of the course is to equip students with a broad range of systematically organized tools for thinking about, understanding, analyzing, and applying narrative theory in and beyond their graduate school experience.
  • On completion of the course, students are not only aware of distinctive schools of “classical” and “postclassical” narratologies but also able to parse and transcribe all kinds of storyworlds across the arts and cultures.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • Students define core concepts in the history and theory of narrative studies and apply them to specific narratives in various media.
  • Students list, compare, and critically evaluate a variety of methods and theoretical concepts in contemporary narratology.
  • Students produce theoretically informed readings of specific narratives and communicate them efficiently to an audience.
  • Students reflect on and articulate the pivotal significance of narrative in human life, literature, and culture.
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Core Concepts in Narrative Theory
  • The Toolkit of Classical Narratology
  • Approaches and Subjects in Postclassical Narratologies
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Summary
    Once during the course, each student writes a one- or two-page summary of an article of book chapter in narratology, which is then to be presented in class according to the schedule set right after the first lecture. The student emails the summary to the course instructor for assessment the day before the seminar presentation.
  • non-blocking Presentation
    After the first lecture, students sign up to make one seminar presentation each within the course duration. In 15-min talks, student introduce a theoretical text to class and lead in a 10-min follow-up discussion.
  • non-blocking Test
    The test is conducted in class, during the final seminar, under the course instructor’s supervision. It lasts 15 minutes. Each student receives 5 random narratological terms to briefly define in writing.
  • non-blocking Essay (Exam)
    At the end of the course, students write a 7-8-pg research paper (Times New Roman 12 pt. double-spaced) analyzing narrative artefacts in the light of the concepts and theories covered in the course.
  • non-blocking Participation
    At seminars, students complete various tasks, discuss texts, ask and answer questions, listen to each other’s presentations and generate ideas.
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • 2022/2023 4th module
    0.16 * Summary + 0.29 * Participation + 0.3 * Essay (Exam) + 0.15 * Presentation + 0.1 * Test
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Hühn, P. (2009). Handbook of Narratology. Berlin: De Gruyter. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=293649
  • Jan Alber, & Monika Fludernik. (2010). Postclassical Narratology : Approaches and Analyses. Ohio State University Press.
  • McQuillan, M. (2000). The Narrative Reader. Taylor & Francis Routledge.

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Caleb Wee, S. (2019). Songs of “Experientiality”: Reconsidering the Relationship between Poeticity and Narrativity in Postclassical Narratology. Word & Text: A Journal of Literary Studies & Linguistics, 9, 93–106.
  • DAVID HERMAN, JAMES PHELAN, PETER J. RABINOWITZ, BRIAN RICHARDSON, & ROBYN R. WARHOL. (2012). Narrative Theory : Core Concepts and Critical Debates. Ohio State University Press.
  • Hansen, P. K., Pier, J., Roussin, P., & Schmid, W. (2017). Emerging Vectors of Narratology. De Gruyter.
  • Hogan, P. C. (2011). Affective Narratology : The Emotional Structure of Stories. UNP - Nebraska.
  • James Phelan, & Peter J. Rabinowitz. (2005). A Companion to Narrative Theory. Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Olson, G. (2011). Current Trends in Narratology. De Gruyter.
  • Phelan, J., & Nielsen, H. S. (2017). Why There Are No One-to-One Correspondences among Fictionality, Narrative, and Techniques: A Response to Mari Hatavara and Jarmila Mildorf. Narrative, 25(1), 83–91. https://doi.org/10.1353/nar.2017.0005
  • Ryan, M.-L., & Thon, J.-N. (2014). Storyworlds Across Media : Toward a Media-Conscious Narratology. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=780583