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Post-doctoral Fellowships

Since 2014 the HSE in St Petersburg Center for Historical Research has been participating in the HSE Post-doctoral Fellows Programme.


Wiktor Marzec

Research Fellow

 

Wiktor Marzec joined the Centre for Historical Research in 2018 after earning his PhD at the Central European University Budapest. With his research topic "The Revolution That Did Not Happen. Rebellion and Reaction in the Post-Imperial Borderlands 1905-1921: Poland and Finland in Asymmetrical Comparison" he became an indispensible staff member of the ERA.Net project "Post-imperial diversity".
Wiktor on his research project:

The Revolution That Did Not Happen. Rebellion and Reaction in the Post-Imperial Borderlands 1905-1921: Poland and Finland in Asymmetrical Comparison
I investigate rebellion and reaction in the post-imperial borderlands between 1905 and 1921. Comparing Poland, Finland and other borderland regions of the Russian Empire I ask about revolutions that succeeded, failed or did not happen at all against the backdrop of nation building and state-crafting in the region. Russian Poland was among the most militant tsarist borderlands during the 1905-1907 Revolution. Harboring long-lasting strikes and breeding bellicose street fighters, Poland witnessed an unprecedented political upheaval manifest in the emergence of mass parties, labor unions and a new public culture. However, only a decade later, when revolutionary movements again loomed large and shook the whole region, Poland remained relatively calm. Forging a new statehood rivaled the earlier popular drive toward social revolution. Despite the Bolsheviks’ march on Warsaw to spread the socialist revolution westwards, the popular mood stuck with national unity. Polish popular classes stood almost unanimously on the side of the Polish nation state, even after it failed to deliver its promise to be a socialist-leaning one. What then were the processes responsible for the withering-away of social-revolutionary tendencies? The project is an asymmetrical comparison of the Polish rebellion, nationalist re-mobilization, and eventual integration of the subaltern classes, with other revolutionary sequences ending in distinct outcomes. The analysis of ideological landscapes will explain the occurring divergences. I will analyze sources on political languages as newspapers and pamphlets against the backdrop of sources documenting social unrest. Deftly integrating historical sociology, conceptual history and historical discourse analysis, my work addresses the entanglement of structural factors and intellectual transformations in political process in highly interdependent trans-national context.

Marzec W., Turunen R. ‘Social-isms in the Tsarist Borderlands. Poland and Finland in a Contrastive Comparison 1830–1907’ //  Contributions to the History of Concepts.  2018. Vol. 113. No. 1. P. 22-50.


 

Dominic Martin

Research Fellow

 

Dominic Martin has joined HSE as a Research Fellow at the Centre for Historical Research in 2017 and holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from Cambridge University (UK). His PhD was based on more than a year's worth of ethnographic and archival research on Old Believers in Russia’s Far East. Dominic is now focused on two new research projects: firstly, on the current descendants of Old Believers, who lived in Manchukuo in the 1930s and 1940s; and, secondly, on the post-Soviet revival of Cossackdom.

Dominic A. Martin. Loyal to god: Old Believers, oaths and orders // History and Anthropology. 2017. Vol. 28. No. 4. P. 477-496.

Being a postdoc at HSE Center for Historical Research: Dominic A. Martin


 

Anton Kotenko

Senior Research Fellow

 

Anton Kotenko received his PhD in 2014 from Central European University in Budapest, where he defended his doctoral dissertation “The Ukrainian project in search of national space, 1861–1914.” In 2014 - 2017 Anton was a Junior Research Fellow at the Centre, and was working on turning the dissertation into a book. His academic interests include history of European modernity, nationalism and science in the nineteenth – first half of the twentieth centuries.

Kotenko A. Imagining Modern Ukraїnica // Ab imperio. 2015. No. 1. P. 519-526.


 

Matthias Battis

Junior Research Fellow

 

Matthias Battis was a Junior Research Fellow at the Centre in 2016 - 2017. He received his PhD in History from the University of Oxford in 2016 for a study on the Russian Orientalist and former colonial clerk Aleksandr Semenov (1873-1958). Previously, Matthias has studied Russian and Eastern European Studies at Oxford and History and Cultural Studies at the universities of Warsaw and Frankfurt (Oder). He is primarily a historian of the Soviet Union with a particular interest in Central Asia. His main languages of research are Russian, Polish, German and, to a lesser extent, Persian.

Battis M. The Aryan Myth and Tajikistan: From a Myth of Empire to one of National Identity // Ab imperio. 2016. No. 4. P. 155-183.


 

Gayle Lonergan

Junior Research Fellow

 

Gayle Lonergan earned her PhD at the University of Oxford in 2010 with a doctoral thesis dealing with the Russian Civil War: "The Paper Communists: the Party and Peasantry in the Russian Civil War (1918-1921)".

Lonergan G. Where Was the Conscience of the Revolution? The Military Opposition at the Eighth Party Congress (March 1919) // Slavic Review. Vol. 74. No. 4 (Winter 2015). P. 832-849.


 

Tanya Zaharchenko

Junior Research Fellow

 

Tanya Zaharchenko earned her PhD in Slavonic Studies in 2014 at the University of Cambridge with a thesis on collective post-soviet memory in the contemporary literature of Eastern Ukraine and the borderlands, specifically in the city of Kharkiv with its hybrid identity. Her Master thesis dealing with oppositional trends within the Russian rock music was defended in 2007 at the University of Oxford.


 

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