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Regular version of the site

Identity, Friendship, Loneliness and Cooperation in World Politics

2020/2021
Academic Year
ENG
Instruction in English
5
ECTS credits
Course type:
Elective course
When:
4 year, 3 module

Instructor

Course Syllabus

Abstract

In this course we approach the sociocultural premises of foreign policy, which often remain implicit yet invite direct inquiry. The idea of the course is a comparative analysis of different schools of International Relations. The main purpose of this course is to explore the role of national identity in international relations. It will introduce concepts, theories and empirical research on the role of collective identities in shaping states' policies. This course is aimed at development of research and academic writing skills. Student actively participates and contributes to the discussions, in accordance with his/her scientific interests among the cutting-edge research and articles published in leading IR and international political theory journals. The thematic focus of the course will include investigation in the field of ontological security studies, nationalism, securitization of identity, sovereignty, transnationalism, cosmopolitanism, multiculturalism, symbolic violence, postcolonial feminism, subaltern studies, performativity, biopolitics, governmentality, emotions and affects in world politics as well as other topics that fall under contemporary research within constructivist, poststructuralist and existential paradigms of international political theory.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • The main goal of this course is to introduce students to the concepts of identity, loneliness and friendship in IR, grounding students in constructivist and post-structuralist traditions of and contemporary international political theory and encouraging them to produce analysis within the framework of ontological security studies.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • able to conduct the research in the field of ontological security studies, nationalism, securitization of identity, sovereignty, transnationalism
  • produces analysis within the framework of ontological security studies
  • finds out the role of national identity in international relations
  • Capable of defining research questions, setting aims and goals, defining the research object and subject, choosing research methods, and of evaluating the quality of research
  • Student is capable of retrieving, collecting, processing and analyzing information relevant for achieving goals in the professional field.
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Introduction. The power of words: using discourse to study (reified?) identity in international politics (critiques of Alexander Wendt)
  • Interpretivism, ‘reflectivism’ and ‘post-positivism’ in research of identity in international politics
  • Identity and ontological security studies (OSS): current state of affairs in international political theory
  • Sovereignty, sovereigntism(s) and ‘geopolitical loneliness’: from ‘politics of loneliness’ towards discussing anthropomorphism in OSS
  • Gender, power, xenophobia, intersectionality and the politics of belonging.
  • Theorizing emotions in world politics (‘aesthetic turn’ in IR)
  • The symbolic and ‘the sublime object of the ideology’ (J.Lacan and psychoanalytical approach to the ‘ontology of the real’)
  • From the critique of ideology to ‘cinematic geopolitics’ (S.Zizek, C.Weber and M.Shapiro)
  • ‘Sounds of nationhood’ and ‘visualization of the nation\: ‘postdisciplinary studies’ of music, literature & art in world politics
  • From solitude to friendship. Speaking of friendship in international relations: what is at stake?
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Written essay
    (1500-2000 words)
  • non-blocking Oral presentation
    Presentations on the topic of the class session will be held for about 10 minutes each week. Each student will present at least once.
  • non-blocking Class activity at seminars
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (3 module)
    0.2 * Class activity at seminars + 0.4 * Oral presentation + 0.4 * Written essay
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • The Oxford handbook of international security edited by Alexandra Gheciu and William C. Wohlforth. (2018).

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Revisiting gendered states feminist imaginings of the state in international relations edited by Swati Parashar, J. Ann Tickner and Jacqui True. (2018).