• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site
Contacts

Address:
190068 Saint Petersburg
123 Griboedov channel, Room 123

Phone:+7 (812)786-92-49 

Postal address: 
190068 Saint Petersburg
123 Griboedov channel

Administration
Department Head Adrian A. Selin
Academic Supervisor Evgeniy Anisimov
Book chapter
Modern Russian and Soviet Drug Suppression

Vasilyev P.

In bk.: The Oxford Handbook of Global Drug History. Oxford University Press, 2022. Ch. 20. P. 373-388.

Working paper
Language and Cultural Contacts in the Russian-Nordic Borderlands: Change and Continuity

Vlakhov A., Deresh A., Mironova E. et al.

Linguistics. WP BRP. НИУ ВШЭ, 2021. No. 108.

Actual Issues of Studying History of Islam

2021/2022
Academic Year
ENG
Instruction in English
3
ECTS credits
Delivered by:
Department of History
Type:
Compulsory course
When:
2 year, 4 module

Instructors

Course Syllabus

Abstract

The course aims to investigate with the students the main tendencies, theories, and methods of modern Islamic studies, to elaborate with them some of the most important sources on the history of Islam and its study in Europe, the USA and Russia, considering the knowledge and skills acquired by students while studying courses on global and Russian history in the frames of the bachelor's programme. Conceptually, it is based upon the ideas of postcolonial theory and the new imperial history. The course examines the intellectual and social history of Islam, its changing discourses, ritual and social networks and practices, the perception of Islam in non-Muslim societies from the perspective of Orientalism. The subject covers: (1) the re-evaluation of the heritage of Islamic studies of the colonial era, (2) the complex of the main topics of postcolonial Orientalism, (3) the prospects for possible further research, with respect to available sources in English and other European languages (optional: Russian, German, French, Italian). This three-part structure determines the content of each of the main thematic units. Chronologically, the course is primarily limited to the 18th – 21st centuries, namely, the colonial and postcolonial eras. Geographically, it covers cases both in the center (Middle East) and on the periphery of the Muslim world, which turned out to be a part of or on the frontier of colonial empires (Caucasus, Volga region, North Africa, Indonesia).
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • to introduce students to Islamic studies as a special part of humanities, which is at the confluence of Asian studies, national, and global history.
  • to analyze with students the main tendencies, theories, and methods of modern Islamic studies.
  • to analyze some of the most important sources on the history of Islam and on its study in Europe, the USA and Russia, considering the knowledge and skills acquired by students while studying the courses on global and Russian history in the frames of the bachelor's programme. Conceptually, the subject is based upon the ideas of postcolonial theory and the new imperial history.
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • - Knowledge of the schools of colonial Islamic studies, their critical review in postcolonial theory, discussions about the main trajectory of the subject in the modern world and Russia.
  • - Visualization of Islam as a problem of historical research. The main approaches and methods of studying visual sources related to Islam and Muslim communities, features of visual propaganda for Muslims
  • - Knowledge of sources and approaches to the history of Islamization of the peripheral Muslim communities. The particularity of the traditional Muslim regions of Russia and the Near Abroad (post-Soviet countries). The ability to apply research methodology of cultural memory to Islamic studies.
  • - Knowledge of approaches to the political history of Islam. The understanding of the significance of the discourses of Caliphate for the socio-political development of the early medieval and modern Muslim communities. Features of the protest movements for the Caliphate and Imamah. The ability to apply discursive analysis and approaches of political anthropology to sources on political history of Islam.
  • - Knowledge of the practices of violence, legalized by Islam, and their transformation over the past three centuries as a reaction of Muslims to (post)colonial globalization. The ability to apply discursive and network analysis to the study of jihad movements.
  • - Consistent understanding and distinction of the concepts of the Muslim spiritual elite (ulama) and the clergy in the history of Islam, including categories, specialization, social functions of the ulama in Muslim communities, their dissimilarity from the clergy in different currents of Christianity
  • - Understanding of how Islamic studies contributes to evolution of humanities
  • - The understanding of the unity and diversity of religious doctrine and religious practices, the syncretism in the history of Islam, the orientalists' fascination to study the "Muslim sects" for evolution of the Islamic studies. The ability to analyze these topics, considering up-to-date methods of the Islamic studies and humanities, including the analysis of networks and practices
  • - The ability to properly apply modern methods for analyzing sources on Sufism and on the cult of Saints in Islam
  • - The ability to apply approaches and methods of history and legal anthropology to Muslim regulatory sources
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking participation in seminars
    Before every seminar, the whole group should read the text enlisted in the basic literature (V=25-35 pages). During the seminar students discuss this text, answer the questions preliminarily prepared by moderator of the seminar discussion, ask their own questions, and comment the text.
  • non-blocking guiding the discussion at the seminars
    Each student will be once appointed to guide the seminar discussion. Appointed student prepares in advance a list of 3-4 questions for the discussion, which he sends to the rest of the group and the teacher no later than 3 days before the seminar. At the beginning of the seminar, this student gives the comments on the text, talk about the author of the text, evaluate his place in historiography. Afterwards this student asks his groupmates the questions about the content of the text, comments on their answers and generally encourages the discussion.
  • non-blocking Final exam
    Oral exam. The examination paper consists of 2 questions, which covers the content of the program's educational materials discussed in lectures and seminars. The students have 45 minutes to prepare their answers and make some general notes for further oral examination. After the preparation all students should present their answers to examinator. The students could get 1-2 additional questions, if they cannot answer properly one or both questions in their examination paper.
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • 2021/2022 4th module
    0.7 * Final exam + 0.15 * guiding the discussion at the seminars + 0.15 * participation in seminars
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • *Masterpieces of Islamic art* : The decorated page from the 8th to the 17th century, Grabar, O., 2009
  • A companion to Islamic art and architecture. Vol.1: From the Prophet to the Mongols, , 2017
  • Adeeb Khalid. (1998). The Politics of Muslim Cultural Reform : Jadidism in Central Asia. University of California Press.
  • Allen J. Frank. (2012). Bukhara and the Muslims of Russia : Sufism, Education, and the Paradox of Islamic Prestige. Brill.
  • Aydin, C. (2007). The Politics of Anti-Westernism in Asia : Visions of World Order in Pan-Islamic and Pan-Asian Thought. New York: Columbia University Press. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=198796
  • Christopher Melchert. (2020). Before Sufism : Early Islamic Renunciant Piety. De Gruyter.
  • Contending visions of the Middle East : the history and politics of Orientalism, Lockman, Z., 2010
  • Frank, A. J. (2012). Bukhara and the Muslims of Russia : Sufism, Education, and the Paradox of Islamic Prestige. Brill.
  • Inside jihadism : understanding jihadi movements worldwide, Khosrokhavar, F., 2016
  • Islam and the Infidels The Politics of Jihad, Da’Wah, and Hijrah, Bukay, D., 2017
  • Islam and the West : conflict or cooperation?, Saikal, A., 2003
  • Islamic Art and Visual Culture : an anthology of sources, , 2011
  • Jihad : a history in documents, Peters, R., 2016
  • Jihadism : past and present, Mohanty, N., 2018
  • Kemper, M. (2005). ’Adat against Shari’a: Russian Approaches toward Daghestani “Customary Law” in the 19Th Century. Ab Imperio, (3), 147–174. https://doi.org/10.1353/imp.2005.0086
  • Kemper, M., & Shikhaliev, S. (2015). Qadimism and Jadidism in Twentieth-Century Daghestan. https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-131761
  • Orientalism, postmodernism and globalism, Turner, B. S., 1997
  • Orientalism, Said, E. W., 2003
  • RB. (2017). The Cambridge History of Islam (1977). Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsbas&AN=edsbas.B6641E90
  • The Hajj : pilgrimage in Islam / edited by Eric Tagliacozzo (Cornell University), Shawkat M. Toorawa (Cornell University). (2016).
  • The history of Islamic political thought : from the prophet to the present, Black, A., 2011
  • The new Cambridge history of Islam : Vol. 1 - 6, , 2010
  • The new Cambridge history of Islam. Vol.6: Muslims and Modernity. Culture and Society since 1800, , 2010

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Hany Moubarez. (2020). Arabic and Islamic Philosophy and Sciences: Method and Truth. Studia Humana, 9(1), 1–4. https://doi.org/10.2478/sh-2020-0001
  • Leaman, O. (2002). An Introduction to Classical Islamic Philosophy: Vol. 2nd ed. Cambridge University Press.