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HSE Campus in St. PetersburgSecond World Congress of Comparative Economics «1917 –2017: Revolution and Evolution in Economic Development»
Second World Congress of Comparative Economics

«1917 –2017: Revolution and Evolution in Economic Development»

St. Petersburg, Russia, June 15 – 17, 2017


    

 Report on the Second World Congress of Comparative Economics
“1917 –2017: Revolution and Evolution in Economic Development”

On June 15 - 17, 2017, the Second World Congress of Comparative Economic “1917 –2017: Revolution and Evolution in Economic Development” was held at Higher School of Economics (HSE University), St. Petersburg, Russia. The event was organized by the European Association for Comparative Economic Studies (EACES), the Association for Comparative Economic Studies (ACES), the Japanese Association for Comparative Economic Studies (JACES), and the Korean Association for Comparative Economic Studies (KACES) in collaboration with the Italian Association for Comparative Economic Studies (AISSEC), the Society for the Study of Emerging Markets (SSEM), the Chinese Economists Society (CES), the European Association for Evolutionary Political Economy (EAEPE)  and other scientific associations and networks.

Following a Call for Papers, almost 700 proposals of paper presentations have been received. After the selection made by the scientific committee, the event brought together 381 participants from 36 countries across the globe. The 2nd WCCE featured keynote talks, special panels, networking events for participants, the electronic resources and book fair, and 91 parallel sessions with 380 papers were presented. The congress scope covered virtually all aspects of the comparative economics studies: institutional design and institutional dynamics; catching up, cyclical development and structural transformation; macroeconomic stability and macroeconomic policies; development of financial and banking sector; labor market and industrial relations; human capital development; industrial organization; issues of regional development; international trade and trade policy; migration and foreign direct investment; issues of international economic integration; and economic history.

The 2nd WCCE was kicked off by a keynote talk from Professor Gerard Roland, University of California Berkeley, USA. Professor Roland discussed Comparative Economics in historical perspective. The keynote speaker of the second day Professor Alexander Auzan of Moscow State University (Russia) looked back at the history of Russian revolutions and their effects on the country’s economic development. Another keynote speaker, Professor James Kai-sing Kung, the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (China), showed the persistent effect of China’s millennium-long civil examination system or keju—an institution designed to select officials to serve in government bureaucracy based on the examination of a coherent corpus of Confucianism-related knowledge.

The Editors’ Panel chaired by Professor Ali M. Kutan, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville (USA); Editor, Emerging Markets Finance and Trade; Co- Editor, Economic Systems; Editor Borsa Istanbul Review, introduced the editors of the prestigious international academic journals, who discussed the aim and the scope of their journals, and elaborated on the expectations from potential contributors.  

The panel discussion "How Do We See Comparative Economics in the Future?" organized by Professor Andrei Yakovlev, HSE University Moscow (Russia), became a notable event in the program of the congress. Its participants discussed an agenda for comparative economics and the role of non-economic factors (like values, beliefs and ideology) in the long-term competition of different models of economic organization among other topics.

Participants of the electronic resources and book fair included Emerald Publishing, Oxford University Press, Taylor & Francis Group, OECD, Cambridge University Press, and HSE Publishing House.

The 3d World Congress of Comparative Economics will take place in Seoul in 2021 and will be organized by the Korean Association for Comparative Economic Studies (KACES).

Comparative Economics is devoted to the study of economic systems, those currently existing as well as systems that have existed in the past or that may exist only in theory. Economic systems consist of economic agents, institutions, incentives, information flows, and policies. Comparative economics studies how these components come into being to form economic systems and how they influence the economic performance of systems. While comparisons of the systems found in different countries have been a major focus of comparative economics research, the field equally embraces the analysis of the individual components of economic systems and of their performance at the level of firms, non-profit institutions, governments, etc.. Comparative Economics also studies how economic systems respond to crisis, economic transition and structural change brought about by globalization or changes in demographics, technology, etc. Also of interest is the effectiveness of policy measures in different economic systems, especially analyses of those policies dealing with current challenges faced by various types of economic systems. The World Congress of Comparative Economics welcomes both studies that are explicitly comparative as well as studies of single countries or sub-systems.

Josef C. Brada Professor emeritus, Arizona State University (USA); Executive Secretary, Association for Comparative Economic Studies

Comparative economics is devoted to the study of economic issues in a comparative perspective. It applies the comparative method to the study of the main aspects of economic activities, both at macro and micro level. From the methodological point of view it studies the relations between systemic characteristics, economic policies and economic performances, financial and real problems, stock and flow relations. At macro-level It considers, for example, the different development patterns between countries or regions, the functioning of the labor market in various countries and institutional contexts, the analyses of economic policies and economic performances in different countries or regions, the inter- country comparison between taxation, monetary policy, industrial policy as well as consumption and investment activities, the impact of different institutions and different systemic characteristics on economic performance. On the micro-level, it studies, for example, in a comparative way, firms’ and consumers’ behavior, differences in the governance of corporation and in industrial relations, financial choices of families, banks and firms.

Vittorio Valli Professor emeritus, Turin University (Italy); First President of the European Association for Comparative Economic Studies