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Магистерская программа «Бизнес и политика в современной Азии»

Research Seminar "Cross-Cultural Communication in Asia"

2021/2022
Учебный год
ENG
Обучение ведется на английском языке
3
Кредиты
Статус:
Курс обязательный
Когда читается:
1-й курс, 4 модуль

Преподаватели


Морозова Валентина Сергеевна

Course Syllabus

Abstract

The course “Cross-cultural Communication in Asia” is designed for two-year master’s programme students, who major in “Business and Politics in Modern Asia” and prepares them for solving research problems, forms knowledge and practical skills of independent research work related to professional activities, including research work in foreign language. The course provides students with fundamentals of intercultural context together with complex knowledge of modern Asia development. It is also devoted to communication between different cultures and includes the study of theoretical aspects of intercultural communication, covering the key-concepts with a wide variety of cases, supported by a comprehensive reading list. The course will focus on: differences between “interaction” and “communication”, “intercultural”, “multicultural” and “cross-cultural”; basic categories of Asian traditional cultures and their modern interpretations; stereotyping in the process of intercultural communication in Asia; national character and main features of Asian business etiquette; intercultural communication and dialogue of cultures in the sociocultural space of modern Asia. Course also identifies characteristics of Chinese business culture that differ from the Japanese (in the dimensions of “high context” / “low context”, collectivism / individualism etc.). Students study the lecture materials, prepare seminar presentations, pass KAHOOT and SmartLMS tests on required material, take part in discussions on selected issues.
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • The course aims to provide students with the tools they need to create cross-cultural communication skills and gain more success with their employers (mainly, Chinese and Japanese companies).
  • The course aims to provide students with the tools they need to create cross-cultural communication skills and gain more success with their employers (mainly, Chinese and Japanese companies).
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • Able to advise individuals, departments and organizations on the development problems of the countries of Asia and Africa, using modern methods of direct and remote (using information and communications technologies) consulting; develop specific proposals for optimizing various types of practical activities.
  • Able to advise individuals, departments and organizations on the development problems of the countries of Asia and Africa, using modern methods of direct and remote (using information and communications technologies) consulting; develop specific proposals for optimizing various types of practical activities.
  • Able to analyze, verify, evaluate the completeness of information in the process of professional activity.
  • Able to analyze, verify, evaluate the completeness of information in the process of professional activity.
  • Able to build professional activities, business and make choices, guided by the principles of social responsibility.
  • Able to build professional activities, business and make choices, guided by the principles of social responsibility.
  • Able to choose consciously interpersonal interaction strategies with representatives of countries and cultural bearers of Asia and Africa.
  • Able to choose consciously interpersonal interaction strategies with representatives of countries and cultural bearers of Asia and Africa.
  • Able to conduct business negotiations in foreign languages (one oriental and English).
  • Able to conduct business negotiations in foreign languages (one oriental and English).
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • 1 year. Lecture 1. The problem of subject definition in cross-cultural communication. Basic categories of Chinese traditional culture and their modern interpretations in the context of cross-cultural communication.
  • 1 year. Lecture 1. The problem of subject definition in cross-cultural communication. Basic categories of Chinese traditional culture and their modern interpretations in the context of cross-cultural communication.
  • Lecture 2. Chinese business etiquette and business world (关系 – “guanxi” system) – socio-cultural norms and rules.
  • Lecture 2. Chinese business etiquette and business world (关系 – “guanxi” system) – socio-cultural norms and rules.
  • Lecture 3. Japanese culture and its’ key concepts.
  • Lecture 3. Japanese culture and its’ key concepts.
  • Lecture 4. Japanese communication culture.
  • Lecture 4. Japanese communication culture.
  • Lecture 1. Cross-cultural communication theories and Chinese communication characteristics
  • Lecture 1. Cross-cultural communication theories and Chinese communication characteristics
  • Lecture 2. Anthropology and Business in China
  • Lecture 2. Anthropology and Business in China
  • Lecture 3. Stereotyping in the process of cross-cultural communication with Chinese – theory and practice
  • Lecture 3. Stereotyping in the process of cross-cultural communication with Chinese – theory and practice
  • Lecture 4. Managing business in China: negotiating with Chinese partners and framework for cross-cultural understanding
  • Lecture 4. Managing business in China: negotiating with Chinese partners and framework for cross-cultural understanding
  • Lecture 5. Discourse of East and West cultures in the process of cross-cultural communication
  • Lecture 5. Discourse of East and West cultures in the process of cross-cultural communication
  • Lecture 6. Japanese communication culture
  • Lecture 6. Japanese communication culture
  • Lecture 7. Japanese companies
  • Lecture 7. Japanese companies
  • Lecture 8. Japanese international companies outside Japan
  • Lecture 8. Japanese international companies outside Japan
  • Lecture 9. Foreigners and Japanese enterprises
  • Lecture 9. Foreigners and Japanese enterprises
  • Lecture 10. Japan in the modern world
  • Lecture 10. Japan in the modern world
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Presentation
    Depending on the number of students, presentations will be conducted in groups by 2-4 students. The time limit for presentation is 20 minutes and should not be exceeded. Students are expected to read literature recommended in the syllabus, as well as to search for extra sources, especially in order to get most recent information on the topic of their presentation. The report begins with the presentation of the topic, abstract and objectives to the audience and ends with conclusions and a list of references. 1. Content of the report - corresponds to the stated topic, fully reveals the topic; - should be made in an academic language; - reporter should present logical and convincing argumentation, complete and reasoned answers to the questions; - lack of factual errors; - reporter should understand the main terms of the report, if necessary – explain their meaning to the audience; - appropriate conclusions to the stated objectives. 2. Presentation design - the presence of illustrative material (maps, diagrams, tables, photos) with an indication of the source; - a list of sources, drawn up in accordance with the requirements. 3. Speech - it is not allowed to read in advance prepared text on any medium; - the roles of the participants are evenly distributed; - compliance with the time limit (20 minutes). NOTE that the highest grade (10) implies the involvement of the audience in the discussion.
  • non-blocking Presentation
    Depending on the number of students, presentations will be conducted in groups by 2-4 students. The time limit for presentation is 20 minutes and should not be exceeded. Students are expected to read literature recommended in the syllabus, as well as to search for extra sources, especially in order to get most recent information on the topic of their presentation. The report begins with the presentation of the topic, abstract and objectives to the audience and ends with conclusions and a list of references. 1. Content of the report - corresponds to the stated topic, fully reveals the topic; - should be made in an academic language; - reporter should present logical and convincing argumentation, complete and reasoned answers to the questions; - lack of factual errors; - reporter should understand the main terms of the report, if necessary – explain their meaning to the audience; - appropriate conclusions to the stated objectives. 2. Presentation design - the presence of illustrative material (maps, diagrams, tables, photos) with an indication of the source; - a list of sources, drawn up in accordance with the requirements. 3. Speech - it is not allowed to read in advance prepared text on any medium; - the roles of the participants are evenly distributed; - compliance with the time limit (20 minutes). NOTE that the highest grade (10) implies the involvement of the audience in the discussion.
  • non-blocking Engagement in class discussions / Test
    Lecturers evaluate students progress, including assigned readings comprehension and contribution to discussions. The component is calculated as an average grade achieved on all seminars. Accumulative marks (min – 0, max – 10) for the participation in class discussions/case-studies are released at the end of the course (before the final assessment takes place).
  • non-blocking Engagement in class discussions / Test
    Lecturers evaluate students progress, including assigned readings comprehension and contribution to discussions. The component is calculated as an average grade achieved on all seminars. Accumulative marks (min – 0, max – 10) for the participation in class discussions/case-studies are released at the end of the course (before the final assessment takes place).
  • non-blocking Written exam
    The exam for the course will be held in the test format on the SmartLMS platform, includes 30 questions. Regulations: quiz = 1 minute, fill the gaps = 2 minutes, open-ended = 3 minutes. Updating the answer is not allowed.
  • non-blocking Written exam
    The exam for the course will be held in the test format on the SmartLMS platform, includes 30 questions. Regulations: quiz = 1 minute, fill the gaps = 2 minutes, open-ended = 3 minutes. Updating the answer is not allowed.
  • non-blocking Engagement in class discussions / Test
    Lecturers evaluate students progress, including assigned readings comprehension and contribution to discussions. The component is calculated as an average grade achieved on all seminars. Accumulative marks (min – 0, max – 10) for the participation in class discussions/case-studies are released at the end of the course (before the final assessment takes place).
  • non-blocking Engagement in class discussions / Test
    Lecturers evaluate students progress, including assigned readings comprehension and contribution to discussions. The component is calculated as an average grade achieved on all seminars. Accumulative marks (min – 0, max – 10) for the participation in class discussions/case-studies are released at the end of the course (before the final assessment takes place).
  • non-blocking Presentation
    Depending on the number of students, presentations will be conducted in groups by 2-4 students. The time limit for presentation is 20 minutes and should not be exceeded. Students are expected to read literature recommended in the syllabus, as well as to search for extra sources, especially in order to get most recent information on the topic of their presentation. The report begins with the presentation of the topic, abstract and objectives to the audience and ends with conclusions and a list of references. 1. Content of the report - corresponds to the stated topic, fully reveals the topic; - should be made in an academic language; - reporter should present logical and convincing argumentation, complete and reasoned answers to the questions; - lack of factual errors; - reporter should understand the main terms of the report, if necessary – explain their meaning to the audience; - appropriate conclusions to the stated objectives. 2. Presentation design - the presence of illustrative material (maps, diagrams, tables, photos) with an indication of the source; - a list of sources, drawn up in accordance with the requirements. 3. Speech - it is not allowed to read in advance prepared text on any medium; - the roles of the participants are evenly distributed; - compliance with the time limit (20 minutes). NOTE that the highest grade (10) implies the involvement of the audience in the discussion.
  • non-blocking Presentation
    Depending on the number of students, presentations will be conducted in groups by 2-4 students. The time limit for presentation is 20 minutes and should not be exceeded. Students are expected to read literature recommended in the syllabus, as well as to search for extra sources, especially in order to get most recent information on the topic of their presentation. The report begins with the presentation of the topic, abstract and objectives to the audience and ends with conclusions and a list of references. 1. Content of the report - corresponds to the stated topic, fully reveals the topic; - should be made in an academic language; - reporter should present logical and convincing argumentation, complete and reasoned answers to the questions; - lack of factual errors; - reporter should understand the main terms of the report, if necessary – explain their meaning to the audience; - appropriate conclusions to the stated objectives. 2. Presentation design - the presence of illustrative material (maps, diagrams, tables, photos) with an indication of the source; - a list of sources, drawn up in accordance with the requirements. 3. Speech - it is not allowed to read in advance prepared text on any medium; - the roles of the participants are evenly distributed; - compliance with the time limit (20 minutes). NOTE that the highest grade (10) implies the involvement of the audience in the discussion.
  • non-blocking Written exam
    The exam for the course will be held in the test format on the SmartLMS platform, includes 30 questions. Regulations: quiz = 1 minute, fill the gaps = 2 minutes, open-ended = 3 minutes. Updating the answer is not allowed.
  • non-blocking Written exam
    The exam for the course will be held in the test format on the SmartLMS platform, includes 30 questions. Regulations: quiz = 1 minute, fill the gaps = 2 minutes, open-ended = 3 minutes. Updating the answer is not allowed.
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • 2021/2022 1st module
  • 2021/2022 1st module
  • 2021/2022 2nd module
  • 2021/2022 2nd module
  • 2021/2022 3rd module
  • 2021/2022 3rd module
  • 2021/2022 4th module
    0,5*Written exam + 0,5*Accumulative grade, where: Accumulative grade = 0,4*PPT(China) + 0,4*PPT(Japan) + 0,2*TEST (discussion)
  • 2021/2022 4th module
    0,5*Written exam + 0,5*Accumulative grade, where: Accumulative grade = 0,4*PPT(China) + 0,4*PPT(Japan) + 0,2*TEST (discussion)
  • 2022/2023 1st module
  • 2022/2023 1st module
  • 2022/2023 2nd module
    0,5*Written exam + 0,5*Accumulative grade, where: Accumulative grade = 0,4*PPT(China) + 0,4*PPT(Japan) + 0,2*TEST (discussion)
  • 2022/2023 2nd module
    0,5*Written exam + 0,5*Accumulative grade, where: Accumulative grade = 0,4*PPT(China) + 0,4*PPT(Japan) + 0,2*TEST (discussion)
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Alexander Prasol. (2010). Modern Japan: Origins Of The Mind - Japanese Traditions And Approaches To Contemporary Life. World Scientific.
  • Evrard, A. Y., & Appadurai, A. (2017). Modernity at Large : Cultural Dimensions of Globalisation. London: Macat Library. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1564340
  • Fiona Graham. (2003). Inside the Japanese Company. Routledge.
  • Geert Hofstede, & Gert Jan Hofstede. (2004). Cultures and Organizations: Software for the Mind. McGraw-Hill Education.
  • Harry Irwin. (1996). Communicating with Asia : Understanding People and Customs. Routledge.
  • Jeff Graham, Javed Maswood, & Hideaki Miyajima. (2002). Japan - Change and Continuity. Routledge.
  • Ming Dong Gu. (2018). Why Traditional Chinese Philosophy Still Matters : The Relevance of Ancient Wisdom for the Global Age. Routledge.
  • Mona Chung, & Bruno Mascitelli. (2015). Dancing With The Dragon : Doing Business With China: Vol. First edition. Business Expert Press.
  • Nishiyama, K. (DE-576)18166769X. (2000). Doing business with Japan : successful strategies for intercultural communication / Kazuo Nishiyama. University of Hawai’i Press.

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Claude Lévi-Strauss. (2013). The Other Face of the Moon. Harvard University Press.
  • Croucher, S. M. (2016). Understanding Communication Theory : A Beginner’s Guide. New York: Routledge. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1055331
  • Fiona Graham. (2005). Japanese Company in Crisis. Routledge.
  • Schweitzer, S., & Alexander, L. (2015). Access to Asia : Your Multicultural Guide to Building Trust, Inspiring Respect, and Creating Long-Lasting Business Relationships. Hoboken, New Jersey: Wiley. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=978132
  • Senko K. Maynard. (1997). Japanese Communication : Language and Thought in Context. University of Hawaii Press.
  • Sergey Mikhnevich. (2016). The Glory of Intelligence: China’s Smart Power and the Implications for Security in the Asia-Pacific Region. https://doi.org/10.17323/1996-7845/2016-01-92
  • Yang, S., Chen, S., & Li, B. (2016). The Role of Business and Friendships on WeChat Business: An Emerging Business Model in China. Journal of Global Marketing, 29(4), 174–187. https://doi.org/10.1080/08911762.2016.1184363