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Russian Sweets You Must Try

A guide to Russian sweets by Rostislav Miretskiy.

Russian Sweets You Must Try

Russians love sweets. From a variety of delicious gingerbread to interesting experiments in bakery, there are all sorts to be found in Russia. Whether you have a sweet tooth or you’re just a casual tourist when it comes to getting your sugar fix, we take you through our guide to the sweets you must try during your stay in Russia.

Tula pryanik (Tula gingerbread)

Tula pryanik is a famous type of imprinted Russian gingerbread from the city of Tula, where it has been made since the 17th century. Usually, Tula pryanik looks like a rectangular tile or a flat figure. Modern Tula pryaniki typically contain jam or condensed milk, while traditionally they were made with honey. In 1996 Tula opened a museum dedicated to its favourite sweet, where you can find out about the history of Tula pryanik and the centuries-old traditions of its production.

Syrniki

Syrniki are one of the most favourite choices for breakfast in post-soviet countries, whereas they’re actually a desert. Syrniki are very similar to pancakes, but they are made out of cottage cheese instead of flour and served with jam, honey or sour cream.

Batonchiki ‘Rot Front’ (‘Rot Front’ soya bars)

The Moscow factory ‘Rot Front’ has been producing chocolate candies for decades. One of the most famous sweets produced there is the ‘Rot Front’ soya bars. These candies were extremely popular during the Soviet era and its packaging has not changed since then. They contain peanuts, butter, sugar and soy milk. They are soft and very tasty, however, you should be careful and not overeat them as these bars have a very high calorie content – about 514 calories per 100 grams.

Ptichye moloko (‘Bird’s milk’ cake)

Imagine tender airy soufflé with rich creamy flavor, complemented with soft biscuit and a thin layer of fine quality dark chocolate. This is the cake of your dreams, and which all Russians know, as ptichye moloko. It has Polish roots but became insanely beloved all over the Soviet Union and it is still extremely popular in Russia. Ptichye moloko got its whimsical name as a reference to an old idiom denoting «something so exquisite, delicate and rare it probably doesn't even exist».

Traditional Pastila

Pastila is one of the oldest and most traditional Russian sweets. It has soft and delicate texture and made from sourish apples or mashed berries, sweetened with honey or sugar and lightened with egg whites. In Soviet era the traditional recipes were corrupted by industrially optimised technology of production, but nowadays, traditional pastila is regaining its popularity with the Kolomna and Belyov versions of this yummy delight. 

Text by
Rostislav Miretskiy