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Магистерская программа «Прикладная и междисциплинарная история»

Historical Memory and Identity Narratives

2019/2020
Учебный год
ENG
Обучение ведется на английском языке
4
Кредиты
Статус:
Курс обязательный
Когда читается:
1-й курс, 3, 4 модуль

Преподаватель

Course Syllabus

Abstract

This course is to introduce students to methodologies that are required for understanding history as a multiple, layered, and contested set of representations. The course is built as an in-depth series of case studies, with the aim of bringing together three distinct areas of analytical questions that are implied by its title’s key terms: “history”, “memory” and “identity”: What are main approaches to social and cultural memory? What, and whose history is being remembered and narrated? How identity is understood?
Learning Objectives

Learning Objectives

  • knowledge of how to analyze key features of text and narrative as historical sources, including the issues surrounding texts’ authorship and edition, and its status as original or copy
  • ability to contextualize historical sources, characterize different texts and narratives, and apply various approaches to the textual analysis
Expected Learning Outcomes

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • understanding theoretical and methodological issues in the analysis of texts and narrative theory, such as fictionality, narrative instances, focalization, plot, discourse, and their implications to historical research
  • learned skills of historical analysis of texts in practice of research
Course Contents

Course Contents

  • Collective memory
  • Sites of memory
  • The economy of memory
  • Body, affect, necropolitics
  • Rituals of memory
Assessment Elements

Assessment Elements

  • non-blocking Seminars participation
  • non-blocking review
  • non-blocking Exam
    Exam is organized in a form of a take home final essay: this is essay-long discussion of randomly selected two questions from the list of exam questions. Exam asks students to debate across empirical material and different approaches covered in the course. Specifically, in answering each of these questions, students are required to use at least three individual pieces of writing from this course syllabus, not to repeat material in discussion of each of the two questions, and in answering both questions to draw on only one piece of readings that you presented on in class. Late assignments will be marked down by 10% of the mark per day and if you plagiarize, you fail. Formula for calculating accumulative and final marks:
Interim Assessment

Interim Assessment

  • Interim assessment (4 module)
    0.7 * Exam + 0.12 * review + 0.18 * Seminars participation
Bibliography

Bibliography

Recommended Core Bibliography

  • Shackel, P. A., Roby, J. R., & Starzmann, M. T. (2016). Excavating Memory : Sites of Remembering and Forgetting. Gainesville: University Press of Florida. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1002991

Recommended Additional Bibliography

  • Andersen, T. S., & Törnquist Plewa, B. (2016). Disputed Memory : Emotions and Memory Politics in Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Europe. Berlin: De Gruyter. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=1259582