• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site

Instructors

Boris Gasparov

Professor and Chair of Comparative literature and linguistics, HSE, St. Petersburg, and Boris Bakhmeteff Professor of Russian studies, Columbia University, New York. Among his publications: Five Operas and a Symphony: Word and Music in Russian Culture (Yale University Press, 2005); Speech, Memory, and Meaning: Intertextuality in Everyday Language (Berlin: Mouton de Gryuter, 2010); Beyond Pure Reason: Ferdinand de Saussure's Philosophy of Language and Its Early Romantic Antecedents (Columbia University Press, 2013); Boris Pasternak: Transcending Poetics[in Russian] (Moscow: NLO, 2013).

 
Ilona Svetlikova

Ph.D. in Slavic studies (2005), an associate professor at HSE St. Petersburg. Since 2013 she has been teaching international students at the European University at St. Petersburg (MARCA: International one-year MA in Russian cultural history and the arts). She is the author of The Origins of Russian Formalism (2005, in Russian) and The Moscow Pythagoreans: Mathematics, Mysticism, and Anti-Semitism in Russian Symbolism (2013, in English), as well as articles on the literature and intellectual history of Russian modernism.

 
Sergei Akopov

Professor Akopov received his Ph.D. in political theory in 2001. In 2015 he defended his Doctor of Sciences thesis in political theory and philosophy at the Institute of Philosophy, Russian Academy of Science (Moscow). He is currently an associate professor at HSE St. Petersburg. He has received a postdoctoral training in Sweden, Denmark and Hungary and has been an invited guest lecturer in Aarhus University (Denmark), Helsinki University (Finland), Tulane University (USA) and Aix-en-Provence (France). He is the author of over 80 papers, articles and book chapters published in Russian, English, Hungarian and Spanish, as well as four books. 

 
Dmitry Goncharov

Ph.D., Doctor of Sciences (St. Petersburg State University, 1997). Professor of Political Science Department, and Director of MA in Politics at HSE St. Petersburg. Dr. Goncharov’s research focus is on Post-Communist civil society and policy-making. His most recent book is Public Administration in Post-Communist Countries: Former Soviet Union, Central and Eastern Europe, and Mongolia.  (Boca Raton: CRC/Taylor & Francis, 2013 (co-editor). Dr. Goncharov is a Visiting Research Fellow at the University of Georgia, USA (1998-9, 2001, and 2003-4) and Central European University, Budapest, Hungary (2003), as well as visiting professor at the University of Montevallo, USA (2006-7).  

 
Jeanne Kormina

Ph.D., Professor at the Department of Sociology, HSE St. Petersburg, social anthropologist, specialist in Anthropology of Religion. Since 2000, she has taught courses on religion, ethnographic methods of research, and introduction to social anthropology in Russia and abroad at Penn State University (USA, 2014) and Eastern University of Finland (2016). Her publications include one monograph and two edited volumes including Invention of Religion in Post-Soviet Context (2015, in Russian).

 
Alexander Semyonov

Ph.D. in History (Central European University), Professor of History, Chair of History Department, associate director for research at HSE St. Petersburg. Dr. Semyonov is a co-founder and co-editor of the international scholarly journal Ab Imperio: Studies of New Imperial History and Nationalism in the Post-Soviet Space. Dr. Semyonov was a Visiting Scholar at the W. Averell Harriman Institute, Columbia University (USA), and a Research Fellow at the Center forEuropean Studies, Rutgers University(USA), Research Fellow at Johannes Gutenberg University (Mainz, Germany) and Associate visiting professor at the University of Michigan and University of Chicago.

 
Marina Loskutova

Received her Ph.D. in Comparative History of Central, South Eastern and Eastern Europe from the Central European University, Budapest (2000). Since then she has taught at the European University in St. Petersburg and at HSE St. Petersburg. In 2001-2002 she was a Jean Monnet Fellow at the Department of History and Civilization, European University, Florence, Italy, in 2002-2003 she was a senior research officer in Modern Russian History at the University of Essex, UK. Her recent work focuses on territorial exploration and exploitation of natural resources in Imperial Russia. 

 
 
Anna A. Dekalchuk

Associate Professor

Dr. Anna A. Dekalchuk is an Associate Professor at the Department of Applied Politics of the HSE in St. Petersburg. She holds her MA degree in European Political and Administrative Studies from the College of Europe in Bruges, Belgium, and a Master’s degree in European Studies from the St. Petersburg State University. In 2015 she defended her PhD thesis at the School of International Relations of the St. Petersburg State University. In spring semester 2018 she is doing research and teaching a course on EU-Russia relations as a Postdoctoral Fellow and Visiting Lecturer of the Russian Studies Workshop at the Indiana University, Bloomington, United States.  

Her research interests cover EU studies, reforms in democracies and autocracies and social reforms in Russia. Anna’s recent publications include “From Hidden Othering to Open Rivalry: Negotiating the EU-Russia Role Structure through the Visa Dialogue” in: eds. by Tom Casier & Joan DeBardeleben, EU-Russia Relations in Crisis: Understanding Diverging Perceptions (Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2018); “Choosing between Bureaucracy and the Reformers: The Russian Pension Reform of 2001 as a Compromise Squared” in: ed. by Vladimir Gel’man, Authoritarian Modernization in Russia: Ideas, Institutions, and Policies (Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2017); “Collective Learning and Regime Dynamics under Uncertainty: Labour Reform and the Way to Autocracy in Russia” in: Democratization.2017. Vol. 24. No. 3. P. 481-497 (co-authored with Ivan S. Grigoriev).

 

 


 

Have you spotted a typo?
Highlight it, click Ctrl+Enter and send us a message. Thank you for your help!
To be used only for spelling or punctuation mistakes.